Food guide: What foods are good for diabetics?

If you’re living with diabetes, you already know that managing your diet is a vital part of controlling your blood glucose level. But nutrition can be complex, especially when dealing with diabetes. What foods are good for diabetics? What should be avoided?

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll examine common Indian foods and explain in simple terms if they’re good for diabetics or not. We’ll also explore their nutritional value, helping you create a dietary plan that’s balanced and healthy.

Whether you’re newly diagnosed or have been living with diabetes for years, you’ll gain valuable insights and practical advice that will help you make informed choices about your diet.

Remember though, everyone is unique, and how a food affects other people may not be how it affects you. When trying new foods, monitor your blood sugar level carefully to identify what your personal response is.

Also, just because you’re a diabetic it doesn’t mean you can’t eat specific foods. It simply means you need to be mindful when planning your meals – Certain foods should only be eaten in moderation, and you should limit how much you include in your diet.

Here’s a list of the foods we’ll consider:

Are almonds good for diabetics?

If you're looking for a crunchy and satisfying snack, almonds can be an excellent choice for a diabetic. These tasty nuts offer several health benefits:

  • Low in carbs – Almonds are low in carbohydrates. This means they have a minimal impact on your blood sugar compared to high-carb snacks.
  • High in fibre and protein – Almonds are rich in fibre and protein, which can help stabilise blood sugar levels. When you eat almonds, they slow down the digestion of carbohydrates, helping to prevent rapid spikes in blood sugar.
  • High in nutrients – Almonds are packed with important nutrients like magnesium (which helps decrease insulin resistance).
  • Healthy fats – Almonds are a source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain). These fats can help improve insulin sensitivity, making it easier for your cells to use glucose.

While almonds are a great snack for diabetics, portion control is key – Eating too many can lead to too many calories in your diet.

A small handful (about 28g or 23 almonds) is a good serving size.

Are alsi (flaxseeds) good for diabetics?

Alsi (also known as flaxseeds or linseeds) are a nutrient-packed superfood that can provide diabetics with several benefits.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Flaxseeds are naturally low in carbohydrates. This means they have a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Flaxseeds are rich in fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of omega-3 fatty acids – Flaxseeds are a great source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of omega-3 fatty acid. Omega-3s have anti-inflammatory properties and can support heart health. This is particularly important for diabetics, as heart issues are a common diabetes-related complication.
  • Good source of phytochemicals – Flaxseeds also contain antioxidants and phytochemicals that can help protect your body's cells from damage. This is again helpful for diabetics, as cell damage is another common diabetes-related complication.
  • May improve cholesterol and blood pressure – Some studies have suggested that eating flaxseeds may help reduce cholesterol and lower blood pressure.

Flaxseeds are a nutrient-packed superfood that can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. They provide fibre, healthy fats and essential nutrients, and can support overall health and blood sugar control. They’re also easy to include in meals (for example, in smoothies, oatmeal, or as a salad topping).

To get the most benefit out of flaxseeds, grind them – This makes them easier to digest.

Are amla (Indian gooseberry) good for diabetics?

Amla (also known as Indian gooseberry) is a popular superfood that has many possible health benefits, including for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Amla has a low glycemic index (GI). This means eating it has minimal effect on blood sugar levels.
  • Rich in vitamin C – Amla is rich in vitamin C, which has antioxidant properties. Antioxidants can help protect cells from damage and inflammation and can help support diabetes management.
  • High in fibre – Amla is a good source of fibre, which can slow down the digestion and absorption of sugar. This helps prevent blood sugar spikes.
  • Helps digestion – Amla can help with digestive issues like constipation and gastrointestinal discomfort (conditions often associated with diabetes).
  • Has anti-inflammatory properties – Chronic inflammation can make diabetes worse. Amla has anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce this problem.
  • Supports heart health – Diabetes increases the risk of heart disease. Amla, however, can help lower cholesterol and support overall heart health.

While amla can offer several benefits for diabetics, as part of a balanced diet you should only eat it in moderation.

Are anjeer (figs) good for diabetics?

Anjeer (also known as figs) are a naturally sweet and nutritious fruit. You can include them in a diabetic diet, but you should be cautious.

  • Moderate glycemic index – Figs have a moderate glycemic index. They have a smaller impact on blood sugar than some high-GI foods but can cause a moderate increase in blood sugar after eating.
  • High in fibre – Figs are a good source of fibre, which can help regulate blood sugar levels. The fibre in figs slows down the absorption of sugar in the bloodstream, preventing rapid spikes.
  • High in potassium – Figs are rich in potassium, which is important for heart health and can help manage blood pressure. This is particularly useful, as heart complications are a common problem for diabetics.
  • Contain antioxidants – Figs contain antioxidants, which can help protect your body's cells from damage. This can be helpful for diabetics, who are at higher risk of cell damage.

While figs have some dietary benefits, because of their natural sugar content you should only eat them in moderation. A small serving of figs (around 2-3) can be a good option for a snack or dessert.

Be careful with dried figs, as they have a higher sugar concentration and are more calories than fresh figs.

Are apples good for diabetics?

Apples are a popular and nutritious fruit and can be a good part of a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Apples have a low glycemic index. This means they have a minimal impact on blood sugar and can be a good snack choice for diabetics.
  • High in fibre – Apples are rich in fibre, particularly soluble fibre (pectin). Fibre can help slow down the digestion and absorption of sugar and prevent spikes in blood glucose.
  • Rich in vitamins and antioxidants – Apples are a good source of essential vitamins and antioxidants. These nutrients help support overall health and can reduce inflammation (a common complication of diabetes).
  • Good for hydration – Apples have a high water content. This means they can help you stay hydrated, which is particularly important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

While apples are a healthy choice, portion control is important. Eat a whole apple as a snack or include it in a meal to enjoy the nutritional benefits without overloading on carbs.

Are avocados good for diabetics?

Known for their creamy texture and healthy monounsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain), avocados can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Good source of healthy fats – Avocados are rich in monounsaturated fats, which are good for your heart. They can also help improve insulin sensitivity, supporting blood sugar control.
  • Low in carbohydrates – Avocados are low in carbohydrates and have a minimal impact on blood sugar.
  • High in fibre – Avocados are a good source of fibre. And fibre can slow down the absorption of sugar and help stabilise blood sugar.
  • Rich in nutrients – Avocados are packed with essential nutrients like potassium (vital for heart health) and vitamin K (which supports bone health).
  • Good for weight management – Avocados keep you feeling full, which can help with weight management.

Avocados are very versatile and can be used in a variety of dishes (including salads and smoothies). But while they offer several benefits for diabetics, you should eat them in moderation due to their calories. A small portion (about half an avocado) is a good serving size, giving you the benefits of avocados without overindulging.

Looking for recipe ideas with avocado? Check out this delicious dish:

Is bajra (pearl millet) good for diabetics?

Bajra (also known as pearl millet) is a nutritious grain that’s a staple in many Indian diets. It can also be a healthy choice for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Bajra has a low glycemic index, which means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Bajra is rich in fibre, which can slow down the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates. This helps prevent spikes in blood sugar.
  • Rich in nutrients – Bajra is packed with essential nutrients, including iron, magnesium, and B vitamins. These nutrients are important for overall health and can support diabetes management.
  • Gluten-free – Bajra is naturally gluten-free. This makes it a safe choice for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity (complications that can often occur with diabetes).

While bajra is a nutritious option for diabetics and can be used in various ways in Indian cuisine (from rotis to porridge), it’s important to consider portion control and preparation methods. Control the portion size and avoid excessive fats as these can add calories.

Are bananas good for diabetics?

Bananas are a popular and naturally sweet fruit. However, diabetics should be careful if considering including them in a diet plan.

  • Variable glycemic index – The glycemic index of a banana varies depending on its ripeness. Riper bananas have a higher GI, and eating them can lead to faster increases in blood sugar. Less ripe bananas have a lower GI though still have a moderate glycemic index.
  • Rich in carbohydrates – Bananas are high in carbohydrates. This means if you eat them in large quantities, they can cause a rapid increase in blood sugar.
  • High in fibre – While bananas are carb-rich, they’re also high in fibre. Fibre can help slow down the digestion of carbohydrates, which may reduce the risk of blood sugar spikes.
  • Rich in nutrients – Bananas are a good source of essential nutrients like potassium (good for heart health) and vitamin C (important for immune function).

Bananas have some benefits for diabetics, but you should be mindful when including them in your meal plans. Avoid overripe bananas, choose smaller ones, and eat them in moderation – Half a banana can be a reasonable serving size for a snack.

It’s also worth checking how your body responds to them. While the carbohydrates in bananas may cause a rapid increase in your blood sugar, the fibre content in them could also slow your digestion and help to reduce this risk – Everyone is different, so monitor your blood sugar level to identify the effect of bananas on your body.

Is barley good for diabetics?

Barley is a whole grain that delivers several health benefits, making it a popular choice with diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Barley has a low glycemic index, which means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Very high in fibre – Barley is very rich in fibre, particularly beta-glucans (soluble fibres that come from cell walls). Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can increase insulin sensitivity, improving blood sugar control.
  • Complex carbohydrates – Barley is a source of complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are digested more slowly, meaning their impact on blood sugar levels is more gradual and easier to manage.
  • Nutrient-dense – Barley is packed with essential nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. These nutrients help support overall health and diabetes management.
  • Good for weight management – Because barley is so high in fibre, it can help you feel full and satisfied. This can assist with weight management, which is important for many diabetics.

With its low impact on blood sugar, numerous health benefits, and ability to be included in several dishes (such as soups, salads, and side dishes), barley is an excellent choice for diabetics. Just keep portion control in mind to maintain a balanced amount of carbohydrates in your diet.

Is basmati rice good for diabetics?

Basmati rice, with its aromatic scent and long grains, is a staple in Indian cuisine. However, it should be considered carefully and in moderation in a diabetic diet plan.

  • Low-moderate glycemic index – Basmati rice has a low-moderate glycemic index. This is lower than other types of rice but still means it will have a moderate effect on blood sugar.
  • Low in fibre – Basmati rice isn’t rich in fibre. It’s higher than white rice but lower than brown rice and other whole grains. This means it doesn’t help in blood sugar control or management.
  • High in carbohydrates – Basmati rice is high in carbohydrates, which can cause a rapid spike in blood sugar.

If you’re including basmati rice in your diabetic diet plan, make sure to eat only small servings – This will reduce the risk of significant spikes in blood sugar.

You should also rinse and soak the rice before cooking and avoid overcooking it, as this can help reduce the glycemic load.

Finally, combine basmati rice with other foods that are rich in fibre, protein, and healthy fats (such as vegetables, lentils, or lean proteins) to help slow the digestion of carbohydrates and reduce the impact on blood sugar levels.

Is beer good for diabetics?

While beer is a popular alcoholic beverage, it does present some problems for diabetics.

  • Alcohol and blood sugar – Alcohol can cause variations in blood sugar. Beer contains carbohydrates (which increase blood sugar) and alcohol that can affect the liver’s ability to regulate glucose.
  • Empty calories – Beer is calorie-dense and doesn't provide any essential nutrients. And if you drink a lot of beer, it can cause weight gain, which can make diabetes worse.
  • Risk of hypoglycemia – In some people, drinking alcohol can lead to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). The risk of hypoglycemia due to alcohol can increase if you take insulin or certain diabetic medications.

If you’re going to drink beer as a diabetic, you should:

  • Limit how much you drink – Drink only in moderation, limit yourself to 1 or 2 drinks, and avoid drinking on an empty stomach.
  • Consider the beer’s carbohydrates – When planning your meals, medication and insulin, include the beer’s carbohydrates in your calculations.
  • Drink water – Alcohol can cause dehydration, which can also increase blood sugar level. To stay hydrated, drink water alongside your beer.

Is beetroot good for diabetics?

Beetroot (also known as beets) is a nutrient-packed vegetable that can be a healthy addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Beets have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderate quantities, they have a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Beets are rich in fibre, which can help control blood sugar levels by slowing down the absorption of sugar in the bloodstream.
  • Rich in vitamins and minerals – Beets are a good source of essential vitamins and minerals, including folate, potassium, and vitamin C. These nutrients support overall health and diabetes management.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Beets contain antioxidants that can protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is particularly useful for diabetics, as cell damage is a common complication of diabetes.

While beets are nutritious and deliver several health benefits, it’s important to control portion sizes and eat them as part of a balanced meal. This is because overeating beets can lead to excess carbohydrates.

Is bhindi (okra or lady fingers) good for diabetics?

Bhindi (also known as okra or lady fingers) is a fibre-rich vegetable that can be a good addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Lady fingers are naturally low in carbohydrates. This means they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Lady fingers are rich in fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre slows the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Lady fingers are relatively low in calories. This makes them a good option for those looking to manage their weight, which is often important for diabetics.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Lady fingers provide several essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate) which support overall health.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Lady fingers contain antioxidants (like quercetin and catechins), which can help protect your body's cells from damage and reduce inflammation. This is particularly helpful for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.

As a fibre-rich vegetable that’s low calorie and nutrient-rich, lady fingers can be a valuable part of a diabetic’s diet, helping to support overall health and blood sugar control. They’re also easy to include in various Indian dishes, such as bhindi masala or sambar.

Looking for recipe ideas with bhindi? Check out these delicious dishes:

Is broccoli good for diabetics?

Broccoli is a nutrient-packed superfood and an excellent choice for diabetics.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Broccoli is low in carbohydrates, which means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Broccoli is high in fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre helps stabilise blood sugar levels by slowing the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates.
  • Nutrient-dense – Broccoli is rich in essential vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium. These nutrients support overall health and diabetes management.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Broccoli contains antioxidants (like sulforaphane) that have anti-inflammatory properties. This can be helpful for diabetics, as inflammation and cell damage are common complications of diabetes.
  • Good for weight management – Because broccoli is high in fibre, eating it can make you feel full and satisfied. This can help with weight management, an important part of managing diabetes.

Broccoli is a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. It’s nutrient-rich, low-carb, and can support blood sugar control and overall health. It’s also very versatile, with many options to include in Indian cuisine (such as curries, stir-fries, and salads).

Is brown rice good for diabetics?

Brown rice is a nutritious whole grain that can be a healthier alternative to white rice for diabetics.

  • Lower glycemic index – While brown rice has a medium glycemic index, it’s lower than white rice. This means that compared to white rice, it has a more gradual impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Brown rice is rich in fibre, particularly bran and germ (which is stripped away in white rice). Fibre slows down the absorption of carbohydrates and helps regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Complex carbohydrates – Brown rice has complex carbohydrates that are digested more slowly. As they’re digested more slowly, they cause a more gradual increase in blood sugar.
  • Nutrient-dense – Brown rice is packed with essential nutrients, including B vitamins, magnesium, and antioxidants. These nutrients support overall health and diabetes management.
  • Good for weight management – The fibre in brown rice can help you feel full. This can help with weight management, which is important for diabetics.

While brown rice is nutrient-rich, and a healthier option than white rice (easily substituted in everything from biryani to pulao), it’s still high in carbohydrates and will increase blood sugar levels. To limit this, portion control and moderation are important.

Is brown sugar good for diabetics?

Brown sugar is a common sweetener in Indian cuisine. However, for diabetics, it’s important to understand the impact it has on blood sugar and only use it in moderation.

  • Moderate glycemic index – Brown sugar has a moderate glycemic index, which means it can cause a moderate increase in blood sugar.
  • High in carbohydrates – Brown sugar, like all sugars, is high in carbohydrates. This means that eating it can cause spikes in blood sugar levels.

If you’re going to include brown sugar in your diet as a diabetic, use it in moderation and manage it accordingly.

  • Practise portion control – Use small amounts only to sweeten dishes and avoid excessive consumption.
  • Balance your meals – Make sure your meals are balanced to compensate for including brown sugar. For example, add it to dishes that are high-fibre or protein-rich, as these will slow the absorption of the sugar’s carbohydrates.
  • Consider alternatives – Where possible, replace brown sugar with a sugar alternative (like stevia, erythritol or monk fruit). These sweeteners have little to no impact on blood sugar and can be a safer option for diabetics.

Is butter good for diabetics?

Butter is a common fat often used in cooking and baking. However, diabetics should be mindful of how much butter they eat.

  • High in calories – Butter is calorie-dense, and if you eat a lot of it can lead to weight gain. This can worsen diabetes management.
  • High in saturated fat – Butter is also high in saturated fat, and eating a lot of saturated fat can contribute to heart disease. Diabetics are already at higher risk of heart complications, so it’s important to limit how much saturated fat they eat.

If you’re going to use butter as a diabetic, you need to only do so in moderation.

  • Practise portion control – Use small amounts of butter for flavour, but avoid overusing it.
  • Consider alternatives – Where possible, replace butter in your cooking and baking with healthier fats like olive oil, avocado, or nuts. These fats are better for your heart health.

Looking for recipe ideas with butter? Check out these tasty treats:

Is buttermilk good for diabetics?

Buttermilk, a traditional Indian beverage, can be a healthy choice for diabetics as long as it’s prepared and drunk carefully.

  • Low glycemic index – Buttermilk has a low glycemic index, meaning it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in carbohydrates – Compared to regular milk buttermilk typically has lower carbohydrates. This makes it a decent alternative to regular milk for diabetes management.
  • Good source of protein – Buttermilk contains protein, which can help stabilise blood sugar levels and provide a feeling of fullness.
  • Good source of probiotics – Some buttermilk contains probiotics that can support gut health. A healthy gut could help contribute to better blood sugar control.
  • Good for hydration – Buttermilk is a hydrating drink. This supports overall health and can help prevent dehydration-related blood sugar spikes.
  • Good source of calcium and vitamins – Buttermilk is a good source of calcium and B vitamins, which are important for overall health.

Buttermilk can be a healthy and refreshing choice for diabetics, but it’s important to prepare and drink it mindfully. To minimise the impact on your blood sugar level, choose plain buttermilk or flavour it with healthier alternatives like herbs and spices (rather than sugar or syrups).

Is cabbage good for diabetics?

Cabbage is a nutritious vegetable that can be an excellent addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Cabbage is low in carbohydrates. This means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels, and is an ideal choice for diabetes management.
  • High in fibre – Cabbage is high in fibre. This means it slows down the absorption of sugar in the bloodstream and can help stabilise blood sugar.
  • Nutrient-dense – Cabbage is packed with essential vitamins and minerals (such as vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium). These nutrients support overall health and can be beneficial for diabetes management.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Cabbage contains antioxidants that can protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is important for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common complications of diabetes.
  • Good for weight management – Because cabbage is high in fibre, it provides a feeling of fullness. This can help with weight management, which is important for diabetics.

Cabbage is a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. It’s low-carb, nutrient-dense, and highly versatile, with options to include it in stir-fries, curries and salads. Including it in your diet can help support better blood sugar control and overall health management.

Are carrots good for diabetics?

Carrots are a nutritious vegetable that can be a healthy choice for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Carrots have a low glycemic index. This means when consumed in moderation, they have a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Carrots are rich in dietary fibre, particularly soluble fibre. This fibre can slow the absorption of sugar, helping regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Carrots are relatively low in calories. This can help weight management, which is important for diabetics.
  • Nutrient-dense – Carrots are packed with essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium). These nutrients support overall health and can help with diabetes management.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Carrots contain antioxidants (like beta-carotene) that can protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is important for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common complications of diabetes.

As a nutrient-packed vegetable with a low glycemic index, carrots are a healthy choice for diabetics. They’re also easy to work into meals, with options to include in salads, stir-fries and curries.

Looking for recipe ideas with carrots? Check out these mouthwatering meals:

Are cashew nuts good for diabetics?

Cashew nuts are a popular and tasty snack, but diabetics should eat them in moderation.

  • Relatively low in carbohydrates – Cashew nuts are relatively low in carbohydrates. This means when eaten in moderation they’ll have a moderate impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in healthy fats – Cashew nuts are rich in monounsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain). Monounsaturated fats can support heart health and improve insulin sensitivity.
  • Good source of protein – Cashew nuts are a good source of protein, which can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Calorie-dense – Cashew nuts are calorie-dense. This means that even a small serving contains lots of calories, and eating too many cashews can lead to weight gain (which can worsen diabetes management).

While cashew nuts are a good source of protein and healthy fats, if you’re going to eat them as a diabetic it’s important to practise mindfulness. Limit your portion sizes to a small serving (like a small handful), and balance them by eating them in a mix with proteins, vegetables and whole grains – This can help reduce the impact they’ll have on your blood sugar.

Is cauliflower good for diabetics?

Cauliflower is a versatile, low-carb vegetable that’s an excellent option for diabetics.

  • Very low in carbohydrates – Cauliflower is very low in carbohydrates. This means when eaten in moderation it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Cauliflower is rich in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar in the bloodstream and can help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Cauliflower is packed with essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate). These nutrients support overall health and can be beneficial for diabetes management.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Cauliflower contains antioxidants that can protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is important for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common complications of diabetes.
  • Good for weight management – The fibre in cauliflower can provide a feeling of fullness. This can help with weight management, an important part of diabetes management.

As a low-carb, nutrient-dense vegetable, cauliflower is a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan, helping support overall health and blood sugar control.

It’s also very versatile – You can include it in curries and salads and even use it as a replacement ingredient, turning it into rice and pizza bases.

Looking for recipe ideas with cauliflower? Check out these delicious dishes:

Is chana (chickpeas) good for diabetics?

Chana (also known as chickpeas) are a protein-rich legume and can be a healthy addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Chana has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in protein – Chana is rich in plant-based protein, which can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Chana is high in fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Chana is packed with essential vitamins and minerals (including folate, iron, and magnesium). These nutrients support overall health and can help diabetes management.

Thanks to their low glycemic index and high protein and fibre content, chana can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet. However, it’s important to eat them in moderation and practise portion control – While chana is a healthy option, eating too many can mean you overindulge in carbohydrates.

Looking for recipe ideas with chana? Check out this mouthwatering meal:

Is cheese good for diabetics?

Cheese is a flavourful, nutrient-rich food that diabetics can enjoy in moderation.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Cheese is low in carbohydrates. This means when eaten in moderation it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in protein – Cheese is a good source of protein. Protein can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • High in calcium and vitamins – Cheese is rich in calcium and vitamins, which are important for overall health.
  • Good source of healthy fats – Cheese is a good source of healthy fats, particularly monounsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain). These fats can support heart health and improve insulin sensitivity.

While cheese has some benefits for diabetics, it’s also important to practise portion control and eat it in moderation. This is because cheese is calorie-dense, and eating too much of it can lead to weight gain (which may worsen diabetes management).

Is chicken good for diabetics?

Chicken is a source of lean protein and can be a healthy, diabetes-friendly diet option.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Chicken is naturally low in carbohydrates. This means that when prepared without added sugars or high-carb ingredients, it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Low in fat – Skinless chicken breast is low in saturated fat. This makes it a heart-healthy option, which is important as diabetics are at higher risk of heart complications.
  • High in protein – Chicken is a rich source of protein, which can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.

As a lean protein option, chicken can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet. It’s very versatile, easy to include in a wide variety of meals and can help support your overall health and control blood sugar levels.

Looking for recipe ideas? Check out these delicious dishes:

Is chyawanprash good for diabetics?

Chyawanprash is a traditional Ayurvedic herbal supplement that’s believed to have several health benefits. However, diabetics considering taking it should be cautious.

  • Wide range of ingredients – Chyawanprash is a complex herbal mixture that contains a wide variety of ingredients. The base ingredient is amla (Indian gooseberry), but the added herbs and spices on top vary by brand. It’s important to check the ingredients of the chyawanprash you’re considering, as some may affect your blood sugar level.
  • Added sugar content – Many chyawanprash products contain added sugar, which can significantly impact blood sugar levels. When considering chyawanprash, try to find one that’s sugar-free or low-sugar.

As a diabetic, you can consider taking chyawanprash. However, choose which product you buy carefully, and check with your doctor that it’s suitable for your diabetes management.

Is cinnamon good for diabetics?

Cinnamon is a popular spice in Indian cuisine and is known for the possible benefits it can provide diabetics.

  • Good source of antioxidants – Cinnamon is rich in antioxidants, which can reduce inflammation in the body. This is useful for diabetics, as inflammation is a common symptom of diabetes-related complications.
  • Flavour enhancer – Cinnamon can enhance the flavour of dishes, allowing you to consider it instead of adding extra sugar or salt. This makes it a valuable addition to diabetes-friendly recipes.
  • May support blood sugar regulation – Cinnamon contains compounds that some studies suggest may help improve insulin sensitivity and lower blood sugar levels.

While cinnamon has some promise in supporting diabetes management, you should use it in moderation – A small amount can go a long way in enhancing the flavour of meals.

You should also choose your cinnamon carefully. There are 2 main types of cinnamon: Ceylon cinnamon and Cassia cinnamon. Of the 2, Ceylon cinnamon is considered safer for regular inclusion in a diet, as it has lower levels of coumarin (a compound that may be harmful if you eat too much).

Is coconut flesh good for diabetics?

Coconut flesh is a nutritious ingredient often used in Indian cooking. It can also be part of a diabetes-friendly diet if included in moderation.

  • Low glycemic index – Coconut flesh has a relatively low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation, it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Coconut flesh is rich in essential nutrients, including vitamins and minerals. This can help support overall health and diabetes management.
  • Calorie-dense – Coconut flesh is calorie-dense. This means that eating a lot of it can lead to weight gain, which can impact diabetes management.
  • Good source of fibre – Coconut flesh is a good source of fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar.
  • Good source of healthy fats – Coconut flesh contains healthy fats, particularly medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs, fatty acids with a chain length of 6-12 carbon atoms). Some studies have shown that MCTs may be good for diabetics and increase insulin sensitivity.

As a diabetic, coconut flesh can be a nutritious and flavourful addition to your diet, offering essential nutrients, healthy fats and fibre. However, as it’s calorie-dense, it’s important to avoid eating too much.

Is coconut milk good for diabetics?

Coconut milk is a creamy and versatile ingredient often used in Indian cuisine. Diabetics can include coconut milk in their diet, but you need to be mindful and use it in moderation.

  • Calorie-dense – Coconut milk is calorie-dense. This means that using it in excess can lead to weight gain, which can impact diabetes management.
  • Good source of healthy fats – Coconut milk is rich in saturated fats, particularly medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs, fatty acids with a chain length of 6-12 carbon atoms). Some research suggests that MCTs may improve insulin sensitivity. However, if taken in excess they can lead to weight gain, which can impact diabetes management.
  • Range of carbohydrates – Coconut milk contains carbohydrates (mainly in the form of sugar and fibre) which can impact blood sugar levels. However, the amount of carbohydrates varies between brands and types of coconut milk, so it’s important to read labels and choose products with lower added sugar.

Coconut milk provides a unique flavour and creamy texture to dishes, but if you’re planning to include it in your diet as a diabetic you need to be mindful and practise portion control. Try to choose brands and types of coconut milk that have less added sugar and lower carbs. You should also limit it to small or moderate amounts and try to balance it in meals with a mix of proteins, vegetables and whole grains – This will reduce the impact it will have on your blood sugar level.

Is coconut water good for diabetics?

Coconut water is a refreshing, natural drink that can be a good choice for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Coconut water has a relatively low glycemic index. This means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Low in carbohydrates – Coconut water is naturally low in carbohydrates. This makes it a good choice as a refreshing drink that won’t cause blood sugar spikes.
  • Good source of natural electrolytes – Coconut water contains natural electrolytes (like potassium). This can help support overall health and diabetes management.
  • Good for hydration – Coconut water is a good source of hydration. This is important for everyone, but particularly diabetics as dehydration can lead to blood sugar spikes.

Coconut water is a refreshing, low-carb drink that can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet. Its ability to hydrate and also provide essential electrolytes can help support overall health without causing blood sugar spikes.

Is coffee good for diabetics?

Coffee is a much-loved drink across not just India but the whole world. However, diabetics need to be careful.

  • Contains caffeine – Coffee contains caffeine, which can temporarily raise blood sugar levels. If you're sensitive to caffeine, monitor how coffee affects your blood glucose level and consider switching to decaffeinated coffee.
  • Impacts appetite – Coffee can temporarily suppress appetite. This may mean you eat less, which can affect blood sugar levels.
  • Acts as a diuretic – Coffee is a diuretic, meaning it can increase urination and may lead to dehydration (which can cause blood sugar spikes).
  • May affect the body’s response to insulin – Research on coffee’s impact on insulin has been mixed. Some studies have suggested that coffee may decrease insulin resistance, others have suggested that coffee decreases insulin sensitivity, and some have found no correlation.

If you’re planning to drink coffee as a diabetic, be mindful. Adding milk or cream will mean adding carbohydrates or fat, which will impact blood sugar levels and overall health. You should also avoid adding excessive amounts of sugar or flavoured syrups to your coffee, stay hydrated, and monitor its effect on your blood sugar level.

Is corn good for diabetics?

Corn is a starchy vegetable and can be used in many ways in Indian cuisine. However, diabetics should be careful and eat it in moderation.

  • High in carbohydrates – Corn is relatively high in carbohydrates, particularly starch. This means eating a large amount of corn can cause a spike in blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Corn also contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.

While corn’s fibre content can be good for diabetics, its high amount of carbohydrates can be a problem for diabetics. If you’re planning to eat corn as a diabetic, be mindful. Practise portion control and limit yourself to small servings – This will help limit the amount of carbohydrates you eat.

You should also include it in balanced meals with protein, healthy fats and other non-starchy vegetables – This will reduce the impact it has on your blood sugar level.

Are corn flakes good for diabetics?

Corn flakes are a popular breakfast cereal, but diabetics should eat them carefully.

  • High in carbohydrates – Corn flakes are mainly carbohydrates. This means they can cause spikes in blood sugar levels, especially if eaten in large portions.
  • Relatively low in fibre – Compared to whole grains like oatmeal or bran cereals, corn flakes are often lower in fibre. Fibre slows the absorption of sugar which can help regulate blood sugar levels, so being lower in fibre means corn flakes aren’t as good at supporting blood sugar management.
  • Added sugar – Many corn flakes are sweetened with added sugars. Eating sugar can lead to blood sugar spikes and is not recommended for diabetics.

If you’re going to eat corn flakes as a diabetic, you need to take steps to minimise their impact on your blood sugar level. Eat small portions and balance them with high-fibre, low-sugar toppings like fresh fruit or nuts – This will provide a feeling of fullness and help regulate your blood sugar level.

You should also read the food labels when selecting corn flakes and choose products that have lower sugar content and higher fibre.

Is corn flour good for diabetics?

Corn flour is used in many Indian recipes. But if you’re a diabetic and planning to include it in your diet, you need to use it carefully.

  • High in carbohydrates – Corn flour is mostly carbohydrates, and it can raise blood sugar levels. When using it in recipes, be mindful of portion sizes.
  • Relatively low in fibre – Corn flour is relatively low in fibre (which helps regulate blood sugar). To balance this, pair it in your dishes with high-fibre ingredients like vegetables or whole grains.

As a diabetic, including corn flour in your diet means you have to be mindful. Limit the amount of corn flour you use in your recipes to reduce the carbohydrates you eat. To help reduce the impact on your blood sugar level, include it in balanced meals that have protein, healthy fats, and non-starchy vegetables. And if you’re buying pre-packaged corn flour, check the food labels – Avoid corn flour products that have added ingredients or preservatives that may not be diabetes-friendly.

Is cucumber good for diabetics?

Cucumber is a hydrating, low-carb vegetable that can be a great addition to a diabetic’s diet.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Cucumber is very low in carbohydrates. This means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Cucumber, particularly the skin, is a good source of fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Cucumber is relatively low in calories, which can help support weight management (an important part of diabetes control).
  • Nutrient-dense – Cucumber contains essential vitamins and minerals (like vitamin K, potassium, and antioxidants). These nutrients support overall health and diabetes management.
  • Good for hydration – Cucumber has a high water content, keeping you refreshed and hydrated. This is important for diabetics, as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

As a diabetic, including cucumber in your meals can help keep you hydrated, support your overall health and improve your blood sugar control. It can also be easily included in a range of Indian dishes (enjoy it in salads and raita or on its own as a healthy snack)

Looking for recipe ideas with cucumber? Check out these delicious dishes:

Is curd (yoghurt) good for diabetics?

Curd (also known as yoghurt) is a probiotic dairy product that can provide several benefits to diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Plain curd has a low glycemic index. This means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of probiotics – Curd contains beneficial probiotics (such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium) that can support gut health. And research has shown that blood sugar control is supported by a healthy gut microbiome.
  • Good source of protein – Curd is a good source of protein. Protein can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of calcium and vitamins – Curd is rich in calcium, vitamin B12, and other essential nutrients that support overall health and diabetes management.

Providing probiotics, protein, calcium and vitamins, curd is a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet. It’s also easy to include in your meals, available in raita and lassi, and even as a base for smoothies.

To avoid added sugars, choose plain, unsweetened curd and add your own flavourings or natural sweeteners.

Looking for recipe ideas with curd? Check out these mouthwatering meals:

Is dalia (bulgur) good for diabetics?

Dalia (also known as bulgur or cracked wheat) is a nutritious whole grain that can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Dalia has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation, it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Dalia is rich in fibre (both soluble and insoluble). Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Dalia is packed with essential vitamins and minerals (including B vitamins, iron, and magnesium), which support overall health and can be good for diabetics.
  • Good source of protein – Dalia is a good source of plant-based protein. Protein can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.

As a nutritious whole grain with a low glycemic index and high fibre content, dalia is a great food for diabetics. It can be included in a diabetes-friendly diet plan in upma or porridge or as an alternative to rice or refined grains.

However, it’s important not to overeat dalia. While it’s a nutritious option, eating too much can mean you take in too many carbohydrates.

Is dark chocolate good for diabetics?

When eaten in moderation dark chocolate can be a delicious and relatively diabetes-friendly treat.

  • Lower sugar content – Compared to milk chocolate, dark chocolate contains less sugar. This means it has less impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants (such as flavonoids), which can help protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This can be particularly helpful for diabetics, as cell damage is a common diabetes-related complication.
  • Good for heart health – Some studies suggest that dark chocolate can help support heart health and improve insulin sensitivity.

The key to enjoying dark chocolate as a diabetic is portion control. Eaten in small amounts, you can limit your carbohydrates and calories while still getting dark chocolate’s benefits.

Choose dark chocolate with a high cocoa content (70% or more), as this will usually mean it has a lower sugar content. And enjoy it as an occasional treat.

Are eggs good for diabetics?

Eggs are a diabetes-friendly superfood that can be a valuable addition to a diabetic’s diet.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Eggs are naturally low in carbohydrates. This means they have a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in protein – Eggs are a rich source of high-quality protein. Protein can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Eggs are packed with essential nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They provide vitamin D, vitamin B12, choline, and many other nutrients that support overall health and can help diabetes management.
  • Good source of healthy fats – Eggs are rich in healthy fats, particularly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and fats that have more than one unsaturated carbon bond). These fats can support heart health, which is particularly important for diabetics, as heart issues are a common diabetes-related complication.

As a protein-packed superfood, eggs are great to include in a diabetes-friendly diet plan. Providing protein, healthy fats and essential nutrients they can support overall health and blood sugar control. They’re also easy to include in meals, with many preparation options (for example, you can have them boiled, scrambled, in salads or curries, etc.).

Looking for recipe ideas with eggs? Check out these mouthwatering meals:

Is fish good for diabetics?

Fish is an excellent food choice for diabetics.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Fish is naturally low in carbohydrates. This means it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in protein – Fish is a great source of high-quality protein. Protein can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of healthy fats – Fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These fats support heart health, which is particularly important for diabetics as heart issues are a common diabetes-related complication. They can also reduce inflammation, lower triglycerides, and improve insulin sensitivity.
  • Nutrient-dense – Fish is packed with essential nutrients like vitamins D and B12 (as well as minerals like iodine and selenium). These nutrients support overall health and are good for diabetes management.

A nutrient-rich source of protein, healthy fats and nutrients, fish can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. It can support heart health, blood sugar control and overall health. It’s also very versatile, and there are many easy ways to include fish in your diet.

Looking for recipe ideas with fish? Check out these delicious dishes:

Is garlic good for diabetics?

Garlic is a flavourful spice with several health benefits and can be part of a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Anti-inflammatory – Garlic contains compounds with anti-inflammatory properties. This can be helpful for diabetics, as inflammation is a common diabetes-related complication.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Garlic is rich in antioxidants, which can help boost the immune system and support overall health.
  • Supports heart health – Garlic is known to support heart health. This is particularly important for diabetics, as heart issues are another common diabetes-related complication.
  • Improves blood pressure – Some studies have shown garlic can reduce blood pressure.
  • Enhances flavour – Garlic can add flavour to a wide variety of Indian dishes. This allows you to enhance the taste of your meals without adding extra sugar or salt.
  • May improve insulin sensitivityStudies suggest that garlic may improve insulin sensitivity and help with blood sugar control.

With its numerous possible benefits, garlic is a good addition to a diabetic’s diet. It can help you add flavour to your meals and may also support heart health, insulin sensitivity and overall well-being.

Looking for recipe ideas with garlic? Check out these mouthwatering meals:

Is ghee good for diabetics?

Ghee is a traditional cooking fat often used in Indian cuisine. If you’re a diabetic though, you need to be careful.

  • No carbohydrates – Ghee doesn’t contain any carbohydrates. This means it has no direct impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in calories – Ghee is calorie-dense. This means you need to use small amounts or it can lead to weight gain (which can impact diabetes management).
  • Good source of healthy fats – Ghee is a source of healthy fats, including monounsaturated fats and saturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and fats that have all single bonds). These fats provide energy and can help support overall health.
  • Flavour enhancer – Ghee adds a rich, distinct flavour to dishes, enhancing the taste of Indian cuisine without the need to add extra sugar or salt.

While ghee is calorie-dense, its healthy fats can provide some health benefits. The key is to use it mindfully – Practise portion control, use only a small amount, and balance it in your meals with a mix of vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins.

For more information, check out our comprehensive analysis of ghee.

Are grapes good for diabetics?

Grapes are a sweet fruit that can be part of a diabetic’s diet if eaten mindfully.

  • High in natural sugars – Grapes are naturally high in sugars (particularly fructose and glucose). This means they can cause rapid blood sugar spikes, especially if eaten in large quantities.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Grapes are rich in antioxidants (such as resveratrol). Antioxidants can support heart health and overall well-being.
  • Good source of fibre – Grapes contain fibre, which slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.

Grapes do have some health benefits for diabetics, but if you’re going to eat them you need to be careful. Eat them in moderation so you limit your carbohydrates, calories, and sugar. And pair them with foods that have protein, healthy fats and fibre to balance your meals and reduce their impact on your blood sugar level.

Also, where possible, instead of green grapes choose red or black – Their skin contains more fibre and antioxidants than green grapes.

Is green tea good for diabetics?

Green tea is a refreshing, natural drink that can have possible health benefits for diabetics.

  • Low in calories – Green tea is nearly calorie-free. This makes it a good drink for weight management, which is important for diabetics.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Green tea is rich in antioxidants (particularly catechins), which can help protect your body's cells from damage and reduce inflammation. This is useful for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.
  • Good for hydration – Drinking green tea can help you stay hydrated. Dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes, so it’s important for diabetics to avoid it.
  • Contains caffeine – Green tea contains caffeine, which can temporarily raise blood sugar levels. If you're sensitive to caffeine, you should limit the amount you drink or choose decaffeinated green tea.
  • May support heart healthSome studies suggest green tea may help improve cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. This is good for diabetics, as heart issues are a common diabetes-related complication.
  • May improve insulin sensitivitySome studies also suggest green tea may improve insulin sensitivity, which can help improve blood sugar control.

Green tea can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet. It’s refreshing and hydrating and may help support your heart health, insulin sensitivity and overall well-being.

Is guava good for diabetics?

Guava is a tasty fruit that can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Guava has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has a minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Guava is a fantastic source of fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • High in vitamin C – Guava is rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that supports overall health.
  • Nutrient-dense – Guava contains essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin A, potassium, and folate) that are good for overall well-being.
  • Good for hydration – Guava has a high water content, which can help you stay hydrated. This is particularly important for diabetics, as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

As a fibre-rich, low-glycemic fruit that provides essential nutrients, guava can be great to add to a diabetic’s diet. It can support blood sugar control and overall health and is easy to include in a diet plan – It can be eaten fresh, added to salads, or blended into smoothies.

Is honey good for diabetics?

Honey is a natural sweetener, and diabetics have to be careful if including it in their diet.

  • High in natural sugars – Honey is mostly natural sugars (such as glucose and fructose). This means it can rapidly raise blood sugar levels, especially if eaten in excess.
  • High glycemic index – Honey has a high glycemic index. Again, this means that compared to other sweeteners it can cause quicker spikes in blood sugar.
  • Low nutrient content – Honey contains small amounts of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, which can be good for overall health. However, the amounts are generally low.

As a diabetic, if you’re planning to include honey in your diet you need to do it mindfully. To limit your carbohydrates and calories, eat it in moderation. And pair it with other nutrient-rich foods (like whole grains, fruits and lean proteins) to create balanced meals.

Is idli good for diabetics?

Idli is a South Indian breakfast staple. However, if you’re a diabetic and planning to include it in your meal plans, you need to be careful.

  • High glycemic index – Idli has a high glycemic index. This means it can cause a spike in blood sugar levels.
  • Low in fat – Idlis are low in fat. This makes them a good choice for those trying to manage their weight (a common focus for diabetics).
  • Nutrient-dense – Idli provides essential vitamins and minerals (including B vitamins, iron, and potassium), which support overall health.
  • Source of fibre – Idli can be a source of fibre, which is good for diabetics. Fibre slows absorption of blood sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Easily paired with sambar and chutney – Sambar (a lentil-based vegetable stew) and coconut chutney add fibre, protein and flavour to a meal and pair excellently with idli.

As a diabetic, you need to be mindful when eating idli. Control your portion sizes to limit your carbohydrates and minimise the impact on your blood sugar level. And include other nutrient-rich foods (like whole grains, fruits and lean proteins) in your meal with idli to help balance it.

Looking for idli recipe ideas? Check out this delicious dish:

Is jaggery (gur) good for diabetics?

Jaggery (also known as gur) is a natural, traditional sweetener. If you’re planning to use it as a diabetic, you need to be careful.

  • High glycemic index – Jaggery has a high glycemic index. This means it can cause blood sugar spikes.
  • Contains natural sugars – Jaggery is mostly natural sugars (such as sucrose, glucose, and fructose). Eaten in excess, these sugars can quickly raise blood sugar levels.
  • Low nutrient content – Jaggery contains small amounts of vitamins and minerals (mostly iron and calcium). However, the quantities are generally low.

If you’re planning to add jaggery to your diet as a diabetic, you need to be mindful. To limit your carbohydrates and calories, control your portion sizes and use it in moderation.

Is jowar (sorghum) good for diabetics?

Jowar (also known as sorghum) is a nutrient-dense whole grain and can be an excellent option for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Jowar has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Rich in fibre – Jowar is high in fibre. This is good for diabetics, as fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Jowar is packed with essential nutrients (including vitamins B3 and B6, magnesium, iron, and antioxidants), which help support overall health.
  • Good source of protein – Jowar is a good source of plant-based protein. Protein can provide a feeling of fullness and help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Gluten-free – Jowar is naturally gluten-free. This makes it a good option for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity (complications often seen in diabetics).

As a nutrient-dense food with a low glycemic index and high fibre content, jowar can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. It’s also simple to include in meals, easily made into rotis (flatbreads) or upma, or added to various dishes.

Just make sure to eat it in moderation to limit your carbohydrates.

Is karela (bitter gourd) good for diabetics?

Karela (also known as bitter gourd) is a great addition to a diabetic’s diet plan.

  • Low glycemic index – Bitter gourd has a low glycemic index. This means it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Bitter gourd is packed with essential nutrients (including vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants). These nutrients can support overall health and may help manage diabetes-related complications.
  • Good for weight management – Bitter gourd can help support weight management. It can provide a feeling of fullness and is low in calories.
  • Supports blood sugar regulation – Compounds in bitter gourd have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity. This means it can support diabetes management by helping to regulate blood sugar levels.

With the benefits bitter gourd can provide, it can be an excellent option for diabetics. It’s also easy to include in a range of Indian meals, including stir-fries, curries and soups.

However, the strong bitter taste of bitter gourd may not be to everyone’s taste. Explore different recipes and cooking methods to find what works for you.

Is kathal (jackfruit) good for diabetics?

Kathal (also known as jackfruit) is a high-fibre, low-glycemic fruit that can be a good diabetes-friendly option.

  • Low glycemic index – Jackfruit has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Jackfruit is rich in fibre (particularly soluble fibre). Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Low in fat – Jackfruit is naturally low in fat. This makes it good for weight management (often an important consideration for diabetics).
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Jackfruit contains essential vitamins and minerals (such as vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium), which support overall health.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Jackfruit is also rich in antioxidants, which can protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is good for diabetics in particular, as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.

As a high-fibre, low-glycemic fruit, jackfruit can be a valuable addition to a diabetic’s diet. It can help support blood sugar control, overall health and weight management.

However, make sure to control your portion sizes to limit your carbohydrates.

Are khajoor (dates) good for diabetics?

Khajoor (also known as dates) are a naturally sweet fruit. Diabetics can eat them but need to be careful.

  • High in natural sugars – Dates are naturally high in sugars (particularly fructose and glucose). If eaten in excess, they can cause rapid spikes in blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Dates contain fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels. It can also provide a feeling of fullness, which can help with weight management (often important for diabetics).
  • Nutrient-dense – Dates are rich in essential nutrients (including potassium, magnesium, iron, and B vitamins) which can help support overall health.

While dates have some nutritional benefits, their high sugar content means they’re not a great addition to a diabetic’s diet. If you’re going to eat them, the key is portion control and balanced meal planning – Eat small amounts to limit your carbohydrates and calories and pair them with other foods that have protein and healthy fats to reduce the impact on your blood sugar level.

Is kiwi (Chinese gooseberry) good for diabetics?

Kiwi (also known as Chinese gooseberry) is a nutrient-packed, low-glycemic fruit that can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Kiwi has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Kiwi is a fantastic source of fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre slows the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Kiwi is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for those looking to manage their weight (often important for diabetics).
  • Good source of vitamin C – Kiwi is rich in vitamin C. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports overall health and can help reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications.
  • Good source of vitamins K and E – Kiwi also contains vitamin K and vitamin E. These vitamins help support healthy blood vessels and protect against oxidative stress.
  • Good source of potassium – Kiwi is also a good source of potassium. Potassium can help manage blood pressure, an important part of diabetes management.
  • Good source of antioxidants – As well as containing the antioxidant vitamin C, kiwi also contains various other antioxidants (such as flavonoids and carotenoids). Antioxidants can help protect your body's cells from damage, which is helpful for diabetics as cell damage is a common diabetes-related complication.

Kiwi is an excellent choice for diabetics. Nutrient-packed, rich in fibre, and with a low glycemic index, it can help support your overall health and blood sugar control.

Is lemon good for diabetics?

Lemon is a low-glycemic citrus fruit that can be a refreshing and diabetes-friendly addition to your diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Lemon has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamin C – Lemon is a rich source of vitamin C. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports your immune system and is good for overall health.
  • Good for hydration – Lemon can be used to flavour water and provides a tasty alternative to sugary drinks. This makes it easier for you to stay properly hydrated, which is important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.
  • Flavour enhancer – Lemon is a useful flavour enhancer, easily added to dishes, beverages, and salads. This allows you to enhance the flavour of your meals without adding many calories, carbohydrates, or extra sugar or salt.

As a low-glycemic citrus fruit, lemon can be great for diabetics. Refreshing and flavourful, it can help provide you with vitamin C and hydration and support your overall health, weight management and diabetes management.

Looking for recipe ideas with lemon? Check out these delicious dishes:

Is mango good for diabetics?

Mango is a delicious and popular fruit. However, for diabetics thinking about adding it to their diet, it comes with some considerations.

  • High glycemic index – Mango has a high glycemic index. This means that compared to some other fruits, it can cause rapid spikes in blood sugar levels.
  • High in natural sugars – Mango is naturally high in sugars (particularly fructose and glucose). This means it can cause rapid blood sugar spikes, especially if eaten in large quantities.
  • Relatively low in fibre – While mango does contain fibre (which is good for diabetics), the amount it contains compared to some other fruits is relatively low. This means it can’t help regulate blood sugar levels as well as other fruits can.
  • Good source of vitamins A and C – Mango is a rich source of vitamins A and C. These vitamins are good for overall health and may support diabetes management.

While mango is delicious, if you’re a diabetic you need to be mindful and enjoy it in moderation. Eat small portions to limit your carbohydrates and calories, and pair it with other nutrient-rich foods (like whole grains, lean proteins and healthy fats) to reduce the impact it has on your blood sugar level.

Looking for recipe ideas with mango? Check out these tasty treats:

Is milk good for diabetics?

Milk is a nutrient-rich drink, but if you’re a diabetic you need to be mindful when adding it to your diet.

  • Contains natural sugars – Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar. This means it can affect blood sugar levels, so you should limit how much you drink.
  • Good source of protein – Milk is a good source of protein, which can help stabilise blood sugar levels. Protein can also provide a feeling of fullness, which can help with weight management (often important for diabetics).
  • Good source of calcium and vitamin D – Milk is rich in calcium and is often fortified with vitamin D. Calcium and vitamin D can help support bone health.
  • Low-fat options – While milk does contain saturated fat, you can limit how much by choosing low-fat or skimmed milk. This is important for diabetics as too much saturated fat is not good for heart health, and diabetics are at higher risk of heart disease.

While milk is a good source of nutrients (including calcium, protein and vitamin D), as a diabetic you should be careful how much you drink. Practising portion control will help you limit your carbohydrates and saturated fats – A standard serving of milk is about 1 cup (240ml).

You should also choose low-fat options to help manage your heart health.

Looking for recipe ideas with milk? Check out this tasty treat:

Is millet good for diabetics?

Millet (including varieties like pearl millet (bajra), finger millet (ragi) and foxtail millet) is a nutrient-dense whole grain. And it can be an excellent option for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Millet (particularly pearl millet and foxtail millet) have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Millet is rich in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Millet is packed with essential vitamins and minerals (including B vitamins, magnesium, iron, and antioxidants) which help support overall health.
  • Good source of protein – Millet is a good source of plant-based protein. Protein can help stabilise blood sugar levels and provide a feeling of fullness (which is helpful for weight management, a common part of diabetes management).
  • Gluten-free – Millet is naturally gluten-free. This makes it a good option for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, problems often experienced by diabetics.

As a nutrient-dense grain, millet is a great addition to a diabetes-friendly meal plan. With its low glycemic index, nutrients, fibre and protein, it can help support blood sugar control and overall health. It’s also easy to include in your meals and can be used to make rotis (flatbreads), upma, and dosa.

Just make sure to practise portion control so you limit your carbohydrates.

Is misri good for diabetics?

Misri (also known as rock sugar or candy sugar) is a traditional natural sweetener. If you’re planning to eat it as a diabetic, you need to be very careful.

  • High glycemic index – Misri has a high glycemic index. This means it can cause spikes in blood sugar levels, even compared to some other sweeteners.
  • Contains natural sugars – Misri is made of natural sugars (mostly sucrose). If eaten in excess, these sugars can rapidly increase your blood sugar level.

If you’re going to include misri in your diet as a diabetic, you need to practise mindfulness. Eat it in moderation to limit your carbohydrates and calories. And pair it with other nutrient-rich foods (like whole grains, fruits and lean proteins) to balance your meal and reduce the impact on your blood sugar level.

Is muesli good for diabetics?

Muesli is a nutrient-packed breakfast option that can be a great choice for diabetics.

  • Typically low glycemic index – Muesli usually contains whole grains (like oats) that have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Muesli is rich in fibre. Fibre slows the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Muesli is packed with essential vitamins and minerals (such as B vitamins, magnesium, and antioxidants), which can help support overall health.
  • Good source of protein – Muesli often contains nuts and seeds, which provide protein. Protein can help stabilise blood sugar levels. It can also provide a feeling of fullness that can help with weight management (an often important part of diabetes management).
  • Low added sugar options – Muesli comes in several varieties. When choosing muesli as a diabetic, look for options low in added sugars or unsweetened. This will reduce the risk of blood sugar spikes.

When eaten in moderation muesli can be a valuable part of a diabetes-friendly diet. It’s packed with nutrients, provides fibre and protein, has minimal impact on blood sugar levels, and can help support overall health.

Are mushrooms good for diabetics?

Mushrooms are low-calorie, nutrient-rich, and can be a great addition to a diabetic’s diet.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Mushrooms are naturally low in carbohydrates. This means they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Mushrooms are a good source of fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Mushrooms are low in calories. This means they can help with weight management, an important part of diabetes management.
  • Nutrient-dense – Mushrooms provide essential vitamins and minerals (including B vitamins, potassium, and antioxidants like selenium), which can help support overall health.
  • Good source of protein – Mushrooms are a good source of plant-based protein. Protein can help stabilise blood sugar levels. It can also provide a feeling of fullness, which can again help with weight management.

With their low carbohydrate and calorie count and rich nutrient profile, mushrooms are an excellent option for diabetics. They can help support blood sugar control, overall health and weight management.

They’re also very easy to include in various Indian dishes, with options to add them to curries, stir-fries and salads.

Is muskmelon good for diabetics?

Muskmelon (also known as cantaloupe) is a refreshing, low-glycemic fruit that can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Muskmelon has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Muskmelon contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Muskmelon is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for people looking to manage their weight (often an important part of diabetes management).
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Muskmelon is rich in essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium), which can help support overall health.
  • Good for hydration – Muskmelon has a high water content, which can help with hydration. Staying hydrated is particularly important for diabetics, as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

As a refreshing, low-glycemic fruit that’s low in calories, high in fibre and a good source of vitamins and minerals, muskmelon is an excellent choice for diabetics. When eaten in moderation it can help with weight management, blood sugar control and overall health.

Are nuts good for diabetics?

Nuts (such as almonds, walnuts and pistachios) are nutrient-packed and can be great, heart-healthy snacks for diabetics.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Nuts are naturally low in carbohydrates. This means they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in protein and fibre – Nuts provide protein and fibre. Fibre slows the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels. And both fibre and protein provide a feeling of fullness, which can help with weight management (an important part of diabetes care).
  • Good source of healthy fats – Nuts are rich in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and fats that have more than one unsaturated carbon bond). These fats are considered ‘heart-healthy’. They can help improve cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease, which is good for diabetics as heart issues are a common complication of diabetes.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Nuts are packed with essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin E, magnesium, and potassium), which help support overall health.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Nuts contain antioxidants that protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is helpful for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.

Nuts are an excellent addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. Packed with nutrients, fibre and protein and low in carbohydrates, they can help support blood sugar control and overall health and reduce the risk of heart disease. They’re also easy to transport and split into good portion sizes, making them great snacks at home or on your travels.

Just make sure to consider portion control – While nuts are nutritious, they’re also calorie-dense.

Are oats good for diabetics?

Oats are a nutrient-rich whole grain that can be an excellent option for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Oats have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Oats are high in soluble fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of protein – Oats provide plant-based protein, which can help stabilise blood sugar levels. Protein also provides a feeling of fullness, which can help with weight management (often important for diabetics).
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Oats are packed with essential vitamins and minerals (including B vitamins, iron, and magnesium), which help support overall health.
  • Good source of beta-glucans – Oats contain beta-glucans. Beta-glucans are a type of soluble fibre that studies have shown to improve blood sugar control.

Nutrient-rich and with a low glycemic index, oats are a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. When eaten in moderation, they can help support blood sugar control and overall health. They’re also very versatile – You can include them in your diet in oatmeal, smoothies or baked goods.

If eating them for breakfast, pair them with low-fat milk or yoghurt and fresh fruit to create a balanced breakfast that supports stable blood sugar levels.

Just be careful when choosing which oats to buy. Instant oats often have added salt and sugars, which means they’ll have more of an impact on your blood sugar level. Steel-cut oats are the least processed, are less likely to have added salt or sugar, and digest slower (making their impact on your blood sugar level slower and easier to manage).

Looking for recipe ideas with oats? Check out these delicious dishes:

Are onions good for diabetics?

Onion is a flavourful, low-calorie vegetable and it can be a healthy addition to a diabetic’s diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Onions have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Onions are low in calories. This makes them a good option for weight management, which is often important for diabetics.
  • Good source of fibre – Onions contain fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Onions are rich in antioxidants (particularly quercetin) that protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is good for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Onions provide essential vitamins and minerals (such as vitamin C and potassium), which help support overall health.
  • Flavour enhancer – Onions add flavour to dishes, allowing you to enhance the taste of your meals without adding extra salt or sugar.

When eaten in moderation onions can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan. With their low glycemic index and high fibre and nutrient profile they can help regulate blood sugar levels and support overall health. They’re also very easy to include in meals and are a good choice for soups, salads and curries.

Looking for recipe ideas with onion? Check out these delicious dishes:

Are oranges good for diabetics?

Oranges are a low-glycemic fruit that can be a delicious, diabetes-friendly addition to your diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Oranges have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Oranges are relatively low in calories. This makes them a good option for weight management (often important for diabetics).
  • High in fibre – Oranges contain fibre. Fibre slows the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • High in vitamin C – Oranges are a rich source of vitamin C, an antioxidant that supports your immune system and overall health. Antioxidants are particularly useful for diabetics as they help protect your body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications).
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Oranges provide essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin A, potassium, and folate), which help support overall health.
  • Good for hydration – Oranges have a high water content. This means eating them can help you stay hydrated, which is important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

Packed with vitamin C and fibre, and with a low glycemic index, oranges are a great option for diabetics. They can help regulate blood sugar levels and also support weight management and overall health.

Is palm sugar good for diabetics?

Palm sugar is a natural sweetener made from the sap of certain palm trees. It’s commonly used in a range of Indian dishes but if you’re planning to eat it as a diabetic you need to be careful.

  • High glycemic index – The glycemic index of palm sugar can vary depending on its type and how it’s been made. However, it usually has a moderate to high glycemic index. This means it can cause quick spikes in blood sugar levels.
  • Contains natural sugars – Palm sugar contains natural sugars (mostly sucrose, glucose, and fructose). These sugars can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.

As a diabetic, if you’re going to eat palm sugar you need to do it mindfully. Control your portion sizes to limit your carbohydrates and calories and reduce the impact it will have on your blood sugar level. You should also pair it with other nutrient-rich foods (like whole grains, fruits, and lean proteins) to balance your meals and again reduce the effect it will have on your blood sugar.

Is paneer good for diabetics?

Paneer is a type of Indian cheese. It’s low-carb, high-protein, and can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet, but you do need to be careful.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Paneer is naturally low in carbohydrates. This means it has a relatively low impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in protein – Paneer is a great source of protein. Protein is good for diabetics as it can help stabilise blood sugar levels. It can also provide a feeling of fullness, which is good for weight management (often important for diabetes care).
  • High in calcium – Paneer is rich in calcium. Calcium is important for bone health and it’s good for diabetes management as diabetics are at a higher risk of bone-related issues.
  • Contains saturated fats – Paneer contains saturated fats (fats that have all single bonds). Saturated fats can impact your cholesterol and increase your risk of heart disease.

While paneer is a nutritious dairy option and can provide some benefits, you need to practise portion control to limit your calories and saturated fats. Eat it in moderation, and if possible choose low-fat paneer to reduce the amount of saturated fat. You should also balance your meals, pairing it with vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats.

Looking for recipe ideas? Check out these delicious dishes:

Is papaya good for diabetics?

Papaya is a nutrient-rich, low-glycemic fruit and it can be a tasty addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Papaya has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Papaya is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for weight management, which is often an important part of diabetes management.
  • High in fibre – Papaya contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • High in vitamins and minerals – Papaya is a rich source of essential vitamins and minerals (particularly vitamin C, vitamin A, and folate), which can help support overall health.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Papaya contains antioxidants (like beta-carotene and lycopene), which can help protect your body's cells from damage and reduce inflammation. This is good for diabetics, as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.
  • Good for hydration – Papaya has a high water content. This means eating it can help you stay hydrated, which is helpful for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

Delicious, nutritious, packed with fibre, and with a low glycemic index, papaya can be a great option for diabetics. It can help support weight management, blood sugar control, and overall health.

Just make sure you eat it in moderation so you limit your carbohydrates and calories.

Is peanut butter good for diabetics?

Peanut butter is a nutrient and protein-rich spread that can be a valuable addition to a diabetic’s diet. However, you do need to eat it mindfully.

  • High in vitamins and minerals – Peanut butter is rich in essential nutrients (like vitamin E, magnesium, and potassium), which can help support overall health.
  • High in calories – Peanut butter is calorie-dense. This means you need to use small amounts or it can lead to weight gain (which can impact diabetes management).
  • Good source of fibre – Peanut butter provides fibre. Fibre slows the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of protein – Peanut butter is a good source of plant-based protein, which can help stabilise blood sugar levels. Protein can also provide a feeling of fullness, which can help with weight management (often an important part of diabetes care)
  • Good source of healthy fats – Peanut butter contains monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and fats that have more than one unsaturated carbon bond). These fats are considered ‘heart-healthy’ and can help improve cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. This is good for diabetics as heart issues are a common complication of diabetes.

Providing protein, fibre, healthy fats and essential nutrients peanut butter can be a good addition to a diabetes-friendly diet. It can help support blood sugar control and overall health. It’s also a great snack, easily paired with whole-grain bread, crackers or fresh fruit, and easy to take with you and enjoy while travelling.

However, if you’re planning to eat peanut butter you need to practise portion control. While peanut butter is nutrient-dense, it’s also calorie-dense, so limit your portion sizes to reduce your calories.

Are peanuts (groundnuts) good for diabetics?

Peanuts (also known as groundnuts) are a nutrient-rich legume that can be a good option for diabetics. However, you need to be mindful when eating them.

  • Low glycemic index – Peanuts have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Peanuts are rich in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • High in calories – Peanuts are calorie-dense. This means you need to limit how much you eat or they can lead to weight gain (which can impact diabetes management).
  • Nutrient-dense – Peanuts are packed with essential nutrients (including vitamins E and B3 and magnesium) and antioxidants like resveratrol. Antioxidants are particularly helpful for diabetics, as they help protect your body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications).
  • Good source of protein – Peanuts are a good source of plant-based protein. Protein can help stabilise blood sugar levels and also promote a feeling of fullness, helping support weight management (often important for diabetics).
  • Good source of healthy fats – Peanuts contain monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and fats that have more than one unsaturated carbon bond). These fats are considered ‘heart-healthy’. They can support overall health, improve cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease (this is helpful for diabetics, as heart issues are common diabetes-related complications.

Providing protein, healthy fats, and essential nutrients peanuts can help support blood sugar control and overall health. They’re also very easy to include in a diet plan, with options to enjoy in curries or chutneys, or as a healthy snack.

However, while peanuts are nutritious, they’re also calorie-dense. Practise portion control and eat them in moderation to limit your calories.

Are pears good for diabetics?

Pears are a fibre-rich, nutrient-packed fruit that can be a tasty addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan.

  • Low glycemic index – Pears have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Pears are relatively low in calories. This makes them a good option for weight management, which is often important for diabetics.
  • High in fibre – Pears are high in fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Pears provide essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium), which help support overall health.
  • Good for hydration – Pears have a high water content. This means eating them can help you stay hydrated, which is important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

With a low glycemic index, fibre-rich and packed with nutrients, pears can be an excellent option for diabetics. They can help support blood sugar control and overall health.

Is pineapple good for diabetics?

Pineapple is a delicious tropical fruit, but if you’re planning to include it in your diet as a diabetic you need to be careful.

  • Contains natural sugars – Pineapple contains natural sugars (mostly fructose). When eaten in excess, natural sugars can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Pineapple is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for weight management, which is often an important part of diabetes care.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Pineapple is rich in essential vitamins (like vitamin C, manganese, and antioxidants), which can help support overall health. Antioxidants are particularly helpful for diabetics as they help protect your body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications).
  • Contains fibre – Pineapple contains some fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good for hydration – Pineapple has a high water content. This means eating it can help you stay hydrated, which is important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

If you’re going to eat pineapple as a diabetic, you need to practise portion control. While it can provide you with fibre, vitamins and minerals, the natural sugars it contains can also affect your blood sugar level. Eat it in moderation to limit this impact and manage your carbohydrates and calories.

Are pistachios good for diabetics?

Pistachios are a nutrient-dense nut that can be a healthy and satisfying snack for diabetics.

  • Relatively low in carbohydrates – Pistachios are relatively low in carbohydrates. This means they have a low impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of fibre – Pistachios are a good source of fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of protein – Pistachios provide plant-based protein. Protein can help stabilise blood sugar levels and provide a feeling of fullness, which can help support weight management (often an important part of diabetes management).
  • Good source of healthy fats – Pistachios are rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and fats that have more than one unsaturated carbon bond). These fats can improve cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease, which is good for diabetics as heart issues are common diabetes-related complications.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Pistachios are rich in essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin B6, potassium, and antioxidants), which can help support overall health. Antioxidants are particularly good for diabetics as they help protect your body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications).

Nutrient-dense, low-carb, and containing healthy fats and fibre, pistachios can be an excellent addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan, helping support blood sugar control and overall health. They’re also easy to include in meals and can be enjoyed as a snack, in salads, or as a yoghurt topping.

Is pitaya (dragon fruit) good for diabetics?

Pitaya (also known as dragon fruit) is a vibrant and nutritious fruit that can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Dragon fruit has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Dragon fruit (particularly its tiny black seeds) is a good source of fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Dragon fruit is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for weight management, which is often important for diabetes control.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Dragon fruit is rich in antioxidants (such as vitamin C and flavonoids), which can help protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation. This is important for diabetics as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.
  • Good for hydration – Dragon fruit has a high water content. This means eating it can help you stay hydrated, which is important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

Fibre-rich and with a low glycemic index, dragon fruit can be a great choice for diabetics. When eaten in moderation it can help support overall health, weight management and blood sugar control.

Is poha (flattened rice) good for diabetics?

Poha (also known as flattened rice) is a low-glycemic breakfast option and can be a good choice for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Poha has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of fibre – Poha contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Poha provides essential vitamins and minerals (including B vitamins, iron, and antioxidants), which can help support overall health. Antioxidants are particularly good for diabetics as they help protect the body’s cells from damage and inflammation, which are common diabetes-related complications.
  • Light and filling – Poha is relatively light and can provide a feeling of fullness. This means it can help with weight management (an often important part of diabetes care).

As a diabetic, eating poha in moderation is a great option. Providing fibre and nutrients, and with its low-glycemic index, it can help support your blood sugar control, overall health and weight management.

To include it in a balanced breakfast, pair it with a mix of vegetables (such as peas, carrots and spices).

Is pomegranate good for diabetics?

Pomegranate is a nutrient-packed, antioxidant-rich fruit that can be a delicious addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Pomegranate has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in antioxidants – Pomegranates are loaded with antioxidants (particularly polyphenols), which can help protect your body's cells from damage and reduce inflammation. This is good for overall health and particularly helpful for diabetics as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications.
  • Good source of fibre – Pomegranates contain fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Pomegranate provides essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium), which can help support overall health.
  • Good for hydration – Pomegranate seeds have high water content. This means eating them can help you stay hydrated, which is particularly important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

Providing essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fibre, pomegranates are an excellent option for diabetics. They can help support blood sugar control and overall health, as well as help protect your body’s cells from damage and inflammation.

As with any fruit though, it’s important to practise portion control and limit how many pomegranates you eat – This will help limit your carbohydrates and calories.

Is popcorn good for diabetics?

Popcorn (when prepared without excessive butter, salt or sugar) can be a good snack for diabetics.

  • Whole grain – Popcorn is a whole grain. This means it contains all parts of the grain (including the bran, germ, and endosperm). Whole grains have a low glycemic index, which means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar.
  • Good source of fibre – Popcorn is a good source of fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – When prepared without excessive butter or sugary toppings (like caramel), popcorn is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for weight management, which is an important part of diabetes management.

Prepared in the right way (without excessive butter, sugar or salt) popcorn can be a diabetes-friendly snack. As a fibre-rich whole grain, it can help support blood sugar control and overall health.

However, while it can be a nutritious snack you need to practise portion control – This will help you limit your calories.

Are potatoes good for diabetics?

Potatoes are a starchy vegetable. If you’re planning to eat them as a diabetic, you need to be careful.

  • High in carbohydrates – Potatoes are rich in carbohydrates (mostly starch) and have a high glycemic index. Carbohydrates can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of fibre – Potatoes also contain fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels, however, the amount of fibre varies depending on the type of potato and how it's prepared.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Potatoes provide essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium), which can help support overall health.

You’ll need to be careful if including potatoes in a diabetic’s diet. While they can provide you with essential vitamins and minerals, and their fibre content can slow the absorption of sugar, their high carbohydrate content means they will still have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.

To help reduce this impact:

  • Consider your preparation method – How you prepare potatoes can greatly affect their impact on your blood sugar and overall health. Boiling or baking is generally better than frying. You should also avoid using excessive oil, butter or high-fat toppings.
  • Balance your meals – When eating potatoes pair them with other nutrient-rich foods (such as vegetables and lean proteins) to create well-balanced meals.
  • Practice portion control – To limit your carbohydrates and calories, limit your portion sizes.

Is pumpkin good for diabetics?

Pumpkin is a low-carb, nutrient-rich vegetable that can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet plan.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Pumpkin is naturally low in carbohydrates. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Pumpkin is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for weight management, which is often an important part of diabetes management.
  • Good source of fibre – Pumpkin provides fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Pumpkin is rich in essential vitamins and minerals (particularly vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium), which can help support overall health.

Low-carb and nutrient-rich, pumpkin is an excellent option for diabetics. It can help support blood sugar control, overall health and weight management.

It’s also very easy to include in a diabetes-friendly diet plan – You can enjoy it in soups, stews, curries and side dishes.

Just practise portion control to help limit your carbohydrates and calories.

Is quinoa good for diabetics?

Quinoa is a protein-packed, nutrient-rich grain that can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Quinoa has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Quinoa is relatively low in calories. This makes it a good option for weight management, which is often an important part of diabetes care.
  • Good source of protein – Quinoa is a complete protein source, providing all essential amino acids. Protein can help stabilise blood sugar levels and also provide a feeling of fullness (which is again helpful for weight management).
  • Good source of fibre – Quinoa contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Quinoa is rich in essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin B, magnesium, and iron), which can help support overall health.

When eaten in moderation, quinoa is an excellent option for diabetics. Packed with protein and nutrients and with a low glycemic index, it can help support blood sugar control, weight management and overall health.

It’s also easy to include in meals – You can enjoy it in salads, pilafs, and even as a breakfast porridge.

Is radish good for diabetics?

Radish is a low-calorie, fibre-rich vegetable that can be a healthy addition to a diabetic’s diet plan.

  • Low glycemic index – Radishes have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Radishes are low in calories. This makes them a good option for weight management, which is an often important part of diabetes care.
  • High in fibre – Radishes are particularly high in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Radishes provide essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin C, potassium, and folate), which can help support overall health.
  • Good for hydration – Radishes have a high water content. This means eating them can help you stay hydrated, which is particularly good for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

Healthy, low-calorie, and fibre-rich, radishes are an excellent option for diabetics. They can help support blood sugar control and overall health and even help you stay hydrated.

They’re also easy to include in meals – You can enjoy them in salads or soups, adding a fresh and spicy flavour to your dishes, or even on their own as a crunchy snack.

Is ragi (finger millet) good for diabetics?

Ragi (also known as finger millet) is a low-glycemic, nutrient-dense grain that can be a valuable addition to a diabetic’s diet.

  • Low glycemic index – Ragi has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Ragi is rich in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of protein – Ragi is a good source of plant-based protein, which can help stabilise blood sugar levels. Protein can also provide a feeling of fullness, which can help with weight management (an often important part of diabetes care).
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Ragi provides essential vitamins and minerals (including calcium, iron, and B vitamins), which can help support overall health.
  • Gluten-free – Ragi is naturally gluten-free. This makes it a good option for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, which can be common diabetes-related complications.

Providing fibre, essential vitamins and nutrients, and with a low glycemic index, ragi is an excellent option for diabetics. When eaten in moderation it can support blood sugar control, weight management and overall health.

It’s also easy to include in a variety of meals – You can use it to make porridge, flour for rotis, or as a base for dosas.

Are raisins good for diabetics?

Raisins (which are dried grapes) are a sweet, natural snack which diabetics can enjoy if they’re careful.

  • Contain natural sugars – Raisins are naturally sweet because they contain concentrated sugars. These sugars can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of fibre – Raisins contain fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – They provide essential vitamins and minerals (including potassium, iron, and antioxidants), which can help support overall health. Antioxidants are particularly good for diabetics as they protect the body’s cells from damage and inflammation, which are common diabetes-related complications.

If you’re planning to include raisins in your diet as a diabetic, you need to be mindful. Because of their natural sugar content, you need to practise portion control to limit your carbohydrates and calories. You should also pair them with other nutrient-rich foods (like nuts or whole grains) to create balanced meals that have less of an impact on your blood sugar level.

If you can get the right balance though, raisins can be helpful to have in your diabetes meal plan. They’re convenient and portable, easily added to oatmeal, yoghurt or salads, or as a travel snack.

Is rava (semolina) good for diabetics?

Rava (also known as semolina) is a grain product that you need to be careful about including in your diet if you’re a diabetic.

  • Moderate carbohydrates – Rava contains carbohydrates. This means if eaten in excess it can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of fibre – Rava contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels. However, the amount of fibre rava contains varies based on how it’s processed and prepared.

As a diabetic, if you’re planning to include rava in your diet you need to be mindful. Control your portion sizes to limit your carbohydrates, and pair it with a mix of vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats to balance your meals.

As long as you’re careful, you can enjoy rava – And there are a wide range of dishes you can use it in, including upma and idlis.

Is red wine good for diabetics?

Red wine is a popular alcoholic drink, but if you’re going to enjoy it as a diabetic you need to be careful.

  • Contains natural sugars – As well as containing alcohol, red wine also contains natural sugars. If drunk in excess, these natural sugars can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Contains resveratrol – Red wine also contains resveratrol. Resveratrol is an antioxidant, which is good for diabetics as antioxidants help protect your body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications). And some studies have shown that resveratrol in particular may improve insulin sensitivity. However, the levels of resveratrol in red wine will vary from product to product.
  • May support for heart healthSome studies suggest that drinking red wine in moderation may support heart health. This is helpful for diabetics as heart issues are a common diabetes-related complication.

Red wine does have some benefits for diabetics, but you need to practise portion control and drink in moderation – The American Diabetes Association recommends limiting alcohol to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men (with 1 drink defined as 5 ounces of wine).

Is rice good for diabetics?

Rice is a staple food in India, but as a diabetic, you need to be mindful if you’re going to include it in your diet plan.

  • Lower glycemic index options – Rice comes in several different varieties, and the glycemic index varies between them. White rice has a high glycemic index, which means it has a significant impact on blood sugar levels. But brown rice and black rice have a lower glycemic index and less impact.
  • High in carbohydrates – Rice contains carbohydrates, which can impact blood sugar levels.
  • Higher fibre options – Rice contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels. Again though, different varieties of rice have different levels of fibre. White rice is considered low in fibre, while brown rice is higher.

Rice can be a part of a diabetic’s diet, but to limit the impact it has on your blood sugar level you need to be careful. Here are steps you can take to enjoy rice and reduce the chance of blood sugar spikes:

  • Choose healthier options – Choose rice that has a lower glycemic index and more fibre. Brown rice and black rice are healthier for diabetics than white rice.
  • Practise portion control – Reduce your portion sizes to control your carbohydrates and calories and limit the impact of rice on your blood sugar level.
  • Balance your meals – When including rice in a meal, pair it with a mix of vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats. This will help balance the meal and reduce the impact of the rice on your blood sugar level.

Looking for recipe ideas with rice? Check out these mouthwatering meals:

Is sabudana (tapioca pearls) good for diabetics?

Sabudana (also known as tapioca pearls) is a starchy food often used in Indian dishes. But if you’re planning to eat it as a diabetic you should be mindful.

  • High in carbohydrates – Sabudana is rich in carbohydrates, mostly starch. Carbohydrates can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in fibre – Unlike some other grains or cereals, sabudana is relatively low in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Low in calories – Sabudana is relatively low in calories. This makes it an option for weight management, which is often an important part of diabetes care.

As a diabetic, if you want to include sabudana in your diet plan you need to be careful. Practise portion control to limit your carbohydrates and calories. And when including sabudana in your meals, pair it with a mix of vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats to balance it and reduce the impact it will have on your blood sugar level.

Is sitaphal (custard apple) good for diabetics?

Sitaphal (also known as custard apple) is a sweet and nutritious fruit that when eaten in moderation can be part of a diabetes-friendly diet plan.

  • Low glycemic index – Custard apple has a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation it has minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Custard apple is a good source of fibre, particularly soluble fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Nutrient-dense – Custard apple contains essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium), which can help support overall health.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Custard apple is rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants are good for diabetics as they can help protect your body's cells from damage and inflammation, which are common diabetes-related complications.

A sweet fruit with a low glycemic index, custard apple can be a tasty addition to a diabetic’s diet. Nutrient-rich and with its high fibre content, it can help support blood sugar control and overall health.

Just make sure to practise portion control and eat it in moderation. While custard apple has a low glycemic index, it does still contain natural sugars – Limiting your portion sizes will help control the impact it has on your blood sugar level.

Is stevia good for diabetics?

Stevia is a natural sweetener made from the leaves of a South American plant, Stevia rebaudiana. It’s a popular option among diabetics and can be a valuable addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Zero glycemic index – Pure stevia has a glycemic index of zero. This means it doesn’t affect blood sugar levels.
  • Zero calories – Stevia isn’t digested so doesn’t contribute any calories. This makes it an excellent option for weight management, which is often an important part of diabetes care.
  • Sweetening power – Stevia is much sweeter than sugar, and a little goes a long way. Using small quantities you can add sweetness to foods and drinks without impacting blood sugar levels.

A natural, calorie-free and powerful sweetener, with a glycemic index of zero, stevia is a great option for diabetics.

It’s also available in several different forms, including liquid drops and powders, so you can choose what suits your needs.

Just be aware that some stevia products have added ingredients like dextrose and maltodextrin – These are types of sugar that have a very high glycemic index and will mean the product has an impact on blood sugar levels.

Looking for recipe ideas with stevia? Check out these tasty treats:

Is sugarcane juice good for diabetics?

Sugarcane juice is a popular, naturally sweet drink. If you’re planning to drink it as a diabetic though, you need to be careful.

  • High sugar content – Sugarcane juice is naturally high in sugar (mostly sucrose). This means drinking it can cause rapid spikes in blood sugar levels.
  • No fibre – Unlike whole fruits, sugarcane juice doesn’t contain any fibre. This means unlike when you eat whole fruits, there’s no fibre to slow down the absorption of sugar and help regulate your blood sugar level.

As a diabetic, sugarcane juice is not a good option for your diet. With its high sugar content and lack of fibre, it can easily cause rapid blood sugar spikes.

If you want to drink it, you need to be very mindful. Here are some steps to take to reduce its impact on your blood sugar level:

  • Practise portion control – Drink it in small quantities. This will limit your carbohydrates and the impact it will have on your blood sugar.
  • Dilute it – Sugarcane juice can be diluted and still be a tasty treat. Drink it with water or soda water to reduce the sugar concentration. And if you need to enhance the flavour, add diabetes-friendly ingredients like mint, ginger, lemon or lime.

Is sweet corn good for diabetics?

Sweet corn is a delicious vegetable. But if you’re a diabetic, you need to eat it in moderation.

  • Moderate carbohydrates – Sweet corn contains carbohydrates, which can have an impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of fibre – Sweet corn provides fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Sweet corn is rich in essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin B, folate, and potassium), which can help support overall health.

Containing moderate carbohydrates, along with fibre, vitamins and minerals, sweet corn can be an option for diabetics as long as it’s eaten in moderation. Practise portion control to limit your carbohydrates and their impact on your blood sugar level.

And when planning your meals, balance it with a mix of vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains – Thankfully this is simple to do, as sweet corn is very versatile (you can easily add it to salads, soups and side dishes).

Are sweet potatoes good for diabetics?

Sweet potatoes are a nutrient-rich vegetable and can be a good option for a diabetes-friendly diet plan.

  • Relatively low glycemic index – Compared to regular potatoes, sweet potatoes have a lower glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have less impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Sweet potatoes are rich in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in calories – Sweet potatoes are relatively low in calories. This makes them a good choice for weight management, which is often an important part of diabetes care.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Sweet potatoes provide essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium), which can help support overall health.

Providing nutrients and fibre and with a relatively low carbohydrate and calorie count, sweet potatoes can be good for diabetics. They can help support weight management, blood sugar control and overall health and are also easy to include in a variety of dishes – You can enjoy them in a sweet potato curry, as roasted sweet potato wedges, or in a salad.

The key is moderation. Practise portion control to limit your carbohydrates and calories. And when including them in your meal plans, balance them with a mix of vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats to help reduce their impact on your blood sugar.

Is tapioca good for diabetics?

Tapioca (which is made from cassava root) is a starchy food and if you’re planning to eat it as a diabetic you need to be careful.

  • High in carbohydrates – Tapioca is rich in carbohydrates (mostly starch). This means it can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Relatively low in fibre – Tapioca is relatively low in fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar, and foods without it can cause blood sugar spikes.

With its high carbohydrate count and low fibre content, tapioca can cause rapid blood sugar spikes and is not a good option for diabetics. To eat it as a diabetic, you need to be mindful. Practise portion control to limit your carbohydrates and their impact on your blood sugar level. And when including tapioca in your diet plan, try to pair it with lean protein, healthy fats and vegetables to balance your meals and reduce the impact it will have on your blood sugar levels.

Are tomatoes good for diabetics?

Tomatoes are a low-carb, nutrient-packed vegetable that can be a great option for diabetics.

  • Low glycemic index – Tomatoes have a low glycemic index. This means when eaten in moderation they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Low in carbohydrates – Tomatoes are naturally low in carbohydrates. Again, this means they have a low impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Tomatoes contain fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Tomatoes are rich in essential vitamins and minerals (particularly vitamin C, vitamin A, and potassium), which can help support overall health.
  • Good source of antioxidants – Tomatoes are a good source of antioxidants, such as lycopene. Antioxidants help protect the body’s cells from damage and inflammation, which is important for diabetics as cell damage and inflammation are common diabetes-related complications. In addition, studies have suggested that lycopene can help improve insulin sensitivity.

As a low-carb, nutrient-packed vegetable, tomatoes are an excellent option for diabetes-friendly diet plans. With their low glycemic index and high fibre and nutrient content they can help support blood sugar control and overall health.

They’re also very easy to include in a wide range of dishes – Enjoy them in soups, salads or curries.

Looking for recipe ideas with tomatoes? Check out these mouthwatering meals:

Are walnuts good for diabetics?

Walnuts are heart-healthy nuts that can be a great addition to a diabetes-friendly diet.

  • Low in carbohydrates – Walnuts are naturally low in carbohydrates. This means they have minimal impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Walnuts provide fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Good source of protein – Walnuts are a source of plant-based protein. Protein can help stabilise blood sugar levels and also provide a feeling of fullness, which can help support weight management (often an important part of diabetes care).
  • Good source of vitamins and minerals – Walnuts are rich in essential vitamins and minerals (including vitamin E, magnesium, and antioxidants), which support overall health. Antioxidants in particular are good for diabetics, as they help protect the body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications).
  • Good source of healthy fats – Walnuts are rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (fats that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and fats that have more than one unsaturated carbon bond), particularly omega-3 fatty acids. These fats can help support heart health, which is important for diabetics as they’re at increased risk of heart disease.

As a heart-healthy, low-carb, nutrient-rich food, walnuts are an excellent option for diabetics. With their healthy fats, fibre and nutrients they can help support weight management, blood sugar control and overall health.

They’re also easy to include in diet plans – Add them to salads or oatmeal to provide extra flavour and nutrition, or enjoy them on their own as a simple, travel-friendly snack.

Is watermelon good for diabetics?

Watermelon is a refreshing, naturally sweet fruit. If you’re planning to eat it as a diabetic though, you need to be mindful.

  • Relatively high glycemic index – Watermelon has a relatively high glycemic index. This means when eaten in large quantities it can cause a rapid increase in blood sugar levels.
  • Contains natural sugars – Watermelon is naturally sweet and contains sugars (mostly fructose). These sugars can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Good for hydration – Watermelon has a high water content. This means eating it can help you stay hydrated, which is particularly important for diabetics as dehydration can cause blood sugar spikes.

If you’re planning to enjoy watermelon as a diabetic, you need to practise moderation. While it can help you stay hydrated, with its high glycemic index it can cause rapid increases in blood sugar levels. To avoid this, practise portion control – Eat small amounts to limit your carbohydrates and minimise the impact on your blood sugar level.

And when including watermelon in your diet, balance it with low-carb foods (like vegetables and lean proteins) to help control your blood sugar level.

Is wheat good for diabetics?

What is a staple grain in India, but if you’re planning to eat it as a diabetic you need to be mindful.

  • High in carbohydrates – Wheat is high in carbohydrates. This means it can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • High in fibre – Whole wheat contains fibre. Fibre slows down the absorption of sugar and can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Lower glycemic index options – Wheat is available in several different varieties and some wheat products (such as whole wheat and whole wheat flour) are higher in fibre and have a lower glycemic index (compared to refined wheat products like white bread or maida). Choose whole wheat to help reduce the impact it will have on your blood sugar level.

Because wheat can have a significant impact on your blood sugar level as a diabetic, you need to be careful. To reduce the risk of blood sugar spikes choose wheat options that have a lower glycemic index, practise portion control to limit your carbohydrates and calories, and pair it with vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats to create balanced meals.

Is white wine good for diabetics?

White wine is a popular alcoholic drink, but to enjoy it as a diabetic you need to practise moderation.

  • Contains natural sugars – As well as containing alcohol, white wine also contains natural sugars. If drunk in excess, these natural sugars can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Contains resveratrol – White wine also contains resveratrol, which is an antioxidant. Antioxidants are good for diabetics as they help protect your body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications). And some studies have shown that insulin sensitivity may be improved by resveratrol. However, the levels of resveratrol in white wine vary from product to product.
  • May support for heart healthSome studies suggest that drinking white wine in moderation may support heart health. This is helpful for diabetics as heart issues are a common diabetes-related complication.

While white wine does offer some health benefits, you need to drink it in moderation. This is particularly important for diabetics, as the natural sugars it contains can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels – The American Diabetes Association recommends limiting alcohol to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men (with 1 drink defined as 5 ounces of wine).

Is wine good for diabetics?

Wine (both red and white), is a popular alcoholic drink. But you need to be mindful if you’re planning to enjoy it as a diabetic.

  • Contains natural sugars – As well as containing alcohol, wine also contains natural sugars. If you don’t drink it in moderation, these natural sugars can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels.
  • Contains resveratrol – Wine (particularly red wine) also contains resveratrol. Resveratrol is an antioxidant, and it can be good for diabetics as it helps protect the body’s cells from damage and inflammation (common diabetes-related complications). Some studies have also shown that resveratrol may improve insulin sensitivity. However, the levels of resveratrol in wine will vary from product to product.
  • May support for heart healthSome studies suggest that drinking alcohol (including wine) in moderation may support heart health. This is helpful for diabetics as heart issues are a common diabetes-related complication.

If you’re going to include wine in a diabetic’s diet plan, pay attention to portion control. Drink in moderation to reduce the risk of alcohol on your body, as well as the impact of wine’s natural sugars on your blood sugar level – The American Diabetes Association recommends limiting alcohol to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men (with 1 drink defined as 5 ounces of wine).

What now - Continue your diabetes food journey

Learning whether or not specific foods are good for you as a diabetic is a great step in improving your diabetes management.

To continue your journey in diabetes diet management:

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